Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23-26

Forensic odontology in India, an oral pathologist's perspective


1 Department of Oral Pathology, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, India
2 Department of Oral Pathology, G Pulla Reddy Dental College, Nandyal Road, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Pushparaja Shetty
Department of Oral Pathology, A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575018
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-1475.85291

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Objectives: Oral pathologists have major responsibilities in the development of forensic science. We conducted a survey to evaluate the degree of involvement of oral pathologists in forensic investigations in India and the difficulties faced by them. Materials and Methods: Data was collected during 2007-2009 by means of a questionnaire survey among qualified oral pathologists related to confidence in handling forensic cases, knowledge and awareness, training in forensic odontology, practical exposure to forensic cases, and difficulties faced. Results: A total of 120 oral pathologists responded to the questionnaire. Of these, 28% expressed confidence in handling forensic cases, 7% had been exposed to formal training in forensic odontology, and 6% had handled forensic cases earlier. Only two participants said that they were part of the forensic team in their respective cities. Forty-eight percent of the participants said that they read forensic journals regularly. Conclusion: Oral pathologists are generally not very confident about handling forensic cases mainly because of inadequate formal training in the field of forensic dentistry, inadequate exposure to the subject, minimal importance given to the subject in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum, and no practical exposure to forensic cases.


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