Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 35-41

A study of composite restorations as a tool in forensic identification


Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Tagore Dental College and Hospital, The Tamilnadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical University, Chennai, India

Correspondence Address:
Bahavathi Ananthan Hemasathya
F-12, Block-2, Casagrande "The Riviera",193, Velachery-Tambaram Main Road, Pallikaranai, Chennai - 600 100
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-1475.114561

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Introduction: Comparing ante-mortem and post-mortem dental data is a principal method of identification in forensic odontology. Radiographic images of amalgam have been used in dental forensics for identification due to their unique appearance. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether radio-opaque composite restorations have a potential for identification in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: Thirty typodont mandibular first molar teeth were prepared with Class-II (proximo-occlusal) cavities and restored with a radio-opaque composite (Tetric N-Ceram). Two sets of standardized radiographs were taken from the 30 teeth, keeping the radiological parameters constant. One set of these 30 radiographs was named as SET 1. Ten randomly chosen radiographs from the other set and two other radiographs of Class-II composite restorations in typodont teeth constituted SET 2. Thirty dentally trained examiners were asked to match the 12 radiographic images of SET 2 with those of SET 1. Results: The results show that 15 examiners were able to correctly match all the 12 images. Statistical analysis was done using kappa statistical test. Conclusion: This study shows that, if the post-mortem radiographs are accurate duplicates of ante-mortem radiographs of composite restorations, then the shape of the composite restoration is unique and can be used for identification.


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