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  Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 171-172  

A simple working type Integrated Rugoscopy Chart proposed for analysis and recording rugae pattern


Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication5-Dec-2016

Correspondence Address:
Aman Chowdhry
Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-1475.195106

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How to cite this article:
Chowdhry A. A simple working type Integrated Rugoscopy Chart proposed for analysis and recording rugae pattern. J Forensic Dent Sci 2016;8:171-2

How to cite this URL:
Chowdhry A. A simple working type Integrated Rugoscopy Chart proposed for analysis and recording rugae pattern. J Forensic Dent Sci [serial online] 2016 [cited 2017 Mar 30];8:171-2. Available from: http://www.jfds.org/text.asp?2016/8/3/171/195106

Sir,

Palatal rugae patterns situated in the anterior third of palate have been studied for various purposes and reports have been published mainly in the fields of anthropology, comparative anatomy, genetics, forensic odontology, and dental specialties (specially prosthodontics and orthodontics).[1],[2],[3],[4],[5] Study of rugae is called as rugoscopy and rugae have been classified by various scientists according to the position, length, shape, direction, and unification.[6],[7],[8]

This letter calls for attention to propose a simple working Integrated Rugoscopy Chart (IRC) for analysis and recording rugae pattern, based on various earlier classifications of rugae [Figure 1]. IRC will be a useful resource as it has several advantages, among which are its ability to carry enormous volume of information and reproduce position, length, shape, direction and unification of rugae on dental casts unmistakably, and in detail on a cost-effective basis.
Figure 1: Integrate Rugoscopy Chart

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Explanation of IRC (following sections describes how to go about filling each section of IRC):

  • Position: This tells the address/location of the rugae. The rugae are designated as left/right and to which quadrant they belong. Palatal rugae area is divided into quadrants, with the goal of attaining the coordinates/position of palatal rugae. For this, six horizontal lines [Figure 2] divide the cast into five zones [Figure 3]
  • Length: Rugae are measured in a straight line between the origin and termination and are grouped into three categories: primary (5 mm or more), secondary (3–5 mm), and fragmentary (2–3 mm). Rugae < 2 mm are disregarded
  • Shape: Based on appearance rugae can be curved/wavy/straight/circular [Figure 4]
  • Direction: Determined by measuring the angle formed by the line joining its origin and termination and the line perpendicular to the median raphe. On the basis of direction rugae can be: forward directed/backward directed/perpendicular [Figure 5]
  • Unification: is said to have occurred when two rugae joined at their origin or termination [Figure 6].
Figure 2: Location of six horizontal lines

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Figure 3: Five zones on the cast

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Figure 4: Shape of rugae

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Figure 5: Direction of rugae

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Figure 6: Unification of rugae

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Shukla D, Chowdhry A, Bablani D, Jain P, Thapar R. Establishing the reliability of palatal rugae pattern in individual identification (following orthodontic treatment). J Forensic Odontostomatol 2011;29:20-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chowdhry A, Sircar K, Popli DB, Tandon A. Image manipulation: Fraudulence in digital dental records: Study and review. J Forensic Dent Sci 2014;6:31-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
3.
Kapoor P, Miglani R. Transverse changes in lateral and medial aspects of palatal rugae after mid palatal expansion: A pilot study. J Forensic Dent Sci 2015;7:8-13.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
4.
Kapali S, Townsend G, Richards L, Parish T. Palatal rugae patterns in Australian aborigines and Caucasians. Aust Dent J 1997;42:129-33.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Acharya AB. Is the research of lip prints and palatal rugae undertaken in India a misdirected endeavor? An opinion based on trends in publication in this journal and international journals. J Forensic Dent Sci 2014;6:149-50.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
6.
Lysell L. Plicae palatinae transversae and papilla incisiva in man; a morphologic and genetic study. Acta Odontol Scand 1955;13 Suppl 18:5-137.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Thomas CJ, Kotze TJ. The palatal ruga pattern: A new classification. J Dent Assoc S Afr 1983;38:153-7.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Venegas VH, Valenzuela JS, Lopez MC, Galdames IC. Palatal rugae: Systematic analysis of its shape and dimensions for use in human identification. Int J Morphol 2009;27:819-25.  Back to cited text no. 8
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4], [Figure 5], [Figure 6]



 

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