Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 103-106

Prevalence of congenitally missing second premolar teeth in the Dravidian population


Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Deepa Gurunathan
Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, 162, Poonamallee High Road, Chennai - 600 077, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfo.jfds_32_19

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Introduction: In the practice of dentistry, one of the most common dental anomalies encountered is the congenitally missing teeth (CMT) with dierent prevalence in each region. CMT are those that fail to erupt in the oral cavity and remain invisible in radiographs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of congenitally missing second premolar teeth in the Dravidian population that can be used in forensic research. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 4600 panoramic radiographs of Dravidian children (2580 girls and 2020 boys) with an age group of 9–17 years were viewed for congenitally missing second premolar teeth. Results: The total number of congenitally missing second premolars was 80 (1.73%). The prevalence was seen more in girls (60%) than boys (40%). Mandibular second premolar was the most commonly missing teeth. Bilateral agenesis (66%) was more prevalent than the unilateral agenesis (34%). Conclusion: The prevalence of congenitally missing second premolar teeth in the Dravidian population was 1.02%. The study of CMT is important in performing dental treatments and also in the field of forensic research as it can provide knowledge on the diversities among populations.


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