Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 41-

Does the periodontal status of peg-shaped mandibular central incisor affect its prognosis?


Saravana Karthikeyan Balasubramanian1, Mahalaxmi Sekar1, Divya Vinayachandran2, Velmurugan Natanasabapathy3,  
1 Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, SRM Dental College and Hospital, Ramapuram, SRM University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, SRM Kattankulathur Dental College and Hospital, SRM University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College and Hospital, MAHER University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Saravana Karthikeyan Balasubramanian
Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, SRM Dental College and Hospital, Ramapuram, SRM University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India




How to cite this article:
Balasubramanian SK, Sekar M, Vinayachandran D, Natanasabapathy V. Does the periodontal status of peg-shaped mandibular central incisor affect its prognosis?.J Forensic Dent Sci 2017;9:41-41


How to cite this URL:
Balasubramanian SK, Sekar M, Vinayachandran D, Natanasabapathy V. Does the periodontal status of peg-shaped mandibular central incisor affect its prognosis?. J Forensic Dent Sci [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 May 28 ];9:41-41
Available from: http://www.jfds.org/text.asp?2017/9/1/41/206487


Full Text

Sir,

This letter to the editor is our observation in response to the recent article, “Devasya A, Sarpangala M. Dracula tooth: A very rare case report of peg-shaped mandibular incisors” that was published in your esteemed journal.[1] It was indeed a significant case study reported by the authors as microdontia of mandibular central incisors is not very common.

The authors had mentioned in the discussion that only four earlier studies have reported the incidence of peg-shaped mandibular central incisors. However, a careful review of literature revealed yet another published report of an isolated mandibular peg-shaped central incisor by Ramachandra et al.[2] In this case, the anomalous tooth was associated with Grade II mobility (clinically) and mild periodontitis in relation to its short root (radiographically). In such cases, mild periodontitis might also affect the prognosis of the tooth adversely. Early identification of such periodontal pathology (if any) is very essential to maintain the longevity of that tooth in the oral cavity, particularly in young patients, as in the reported case. Hence, an intraoral periapical radiograph of the lower “dracula teeth” in this case and an insight discussion pertaining to the aforementioned significant observations would have been more appropriate.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Devasya A, Sarpangala M. Dracula tooth: A very rare case report of peg-shaped mandibular incisors. J Forensic Dent Sci 2016;8:164-6.
2Ramachandra SS, Baliga V, Jithendra KD. Peg-shaped mandibular central incisor. Dent Update 2009;36:439, 441.