Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 43-

Dental sex dimorphism: Using odontometrics and digital jaw radiography


B N. V. S Satish, Chanchal Moolrajani, Maharudrappa Basnaker, Prashant Kumar 
 Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Hyderabad Karnataka Education Society's, S. Nijalingappa Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Gulbarga, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
B N. V. S Satish
Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Hyderabad Karnataka Education Society's, S. Nijalingappa Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Gulbarga - 585 105, Karnataka
India

Context: Estimating the gender from the human skeletal remains can guide the forensic investigator in revealing the missing person's identity. Aims: (1) To determine the utility of the various parameters taken on the orthopantomographs (mandible) and of odontometrics on tooth remains to estimate the gender. (2) To determine the most dimorphic parameter taken on the radiograph as well as tooth (odontometrics) in the study taken. Study and Design: (1) A retrospective study was planned on 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) in the age group of 18–30 years and the following parameters (maximum ramus height, bigonion width, and bicondylar breadth) were measured on the orthopantomograph. (2) A prospective clinical study was planned on 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) in the age group of 18–30 years, to measure the mesio-distal width of permanent maxillary central incisors and canines directly in the patient's mouth, using Digital Vernier calipers. Statistical Analysis Used: The mean, range, and standard deviation were calculated for each variable in the study. The Z-score test was done to find out the magnitude of sexual dimorphism for each parameter in each part of the study. Results: Maximum ramus height proved to be the most dimorphic parameter depicting the utility of mandible for the estimation of gender of the deceased. Permanent maxillary central incisor proved to be more dimorphic than the maxillary canines, depicting it to be population specific. Conclusion: Measurements taken on the mandible proved to be useful in the estimation of gender of the deceased. In cases of fragmentary or missing mandible, odontometrics can be used. Hence, teeth proved to be an adjunct tool in the determination of gender of the deceased.


How to cite this article:
Satish B N, Moolrajani C, Basnaker M, Kumar P. Dental sex dimorphism: Using odontometrics and digital jaw radiography.J Forensic Dent Sci 2017;9:43-43


How to cite this URL:
Satish B N, Moolrajani C, Basnaker M, Kumar P. Dental sex dimorphism: Using odontometrics and digital jaw radiography. J Forensic Dent Sci [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Apr 5 ];9:43-43
Available from: http://www.jfds.org/article.asp?issn=0975-1475;year=2017;volume=9;issue=1;spage=43;epage=43;aulast=Satish;type=0